Influence ‘Options’ Thinking

NLP Snippets: Influence "Options Thinking"

People are also motivated by “options thinking”, or the perception that there are many open windows, opportunities, unlimited possibilities, and that sky’s the limit.

Seeing one amazing pair of shoes is one thing, but having a lot of different brands and pairs of shoes to choose from is more appealing. This is actually where the “shopping” concept began. What does it mean when people “shop”? It simply means, they go explore many options, “flirt” with possibilities, and choose among the best options until they find the right item and settle for it. People enjoy this process more than they enjoy the actual buying itself. That is an example of options thinking.

So how do you influence options thinking? The simple way is to tell them, “Here are the options”. For example, one of the most popular and effective phrases in sales is called the “alternate of choice”. This involves the salesperson asking the potential customer a question that gives him a choice between two positives: “Would you like this car in blue, or do you prefer the green one?” This sales closing technique is effective because it influences options thinking. Another way to do this is to simply state all the available options. For example, if you’re selling insurance you can say, “Here are the options available: We have the 5-year plan for short term coverage, but we also have plans that range from 10 years and above. Let’s evaluate these options.” That’s better than simply dictating to the other person what to do next until he rebels.


Comments

Influence ‘Options’ Thinking — 3 Comments

    • Hey Guy,

      well I looke at it and at first thought: Wow, that is AWESOME.

      in fact this is what I wrote to you in response:

      Wow, that is AWESOME.

      You’ve got me thinking now…

      I love it.

      love it love it love it.

      BUT BUT BUT BUT BUT BUT BUT…

      after a couple of minutes thinking about it, I don’t agree with the statement in the wiki: a player who picks door 1 and doesn’t switch has a 1 in 3 chance of winning the car while a player who picks door 1 and does switch has a 2 in 3 chance, because the host has removed an incorrect option from the unchosen doors, so contestants who switch double their chances of winning the car.

      the point seems to be that initially the probability was 1 in 3 and that stat is kept if the contestant sticks with their choice (door 1) & the new probability is 1 in 2 if the contestant changes their choice.

      I would argue that the choice to stick with door 1 is made with new information and also has a 1 in 2 chance the 3rd door having been eliminated so it’s at that point it’s a 50/50 chance whatever door is picked.

      voila, years of pointless debate solved 😉

  1. This is an amazing blog page. I’m serious. They have so much knowing on this subject, so much attention. They also know how to do habitancy shift behind him, apparently from the alternatives. You have got here is not to find the obvious.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *